Cheating at Slots

In this day and age of computerized operation for almost any imaginable purpose, slots cheaters are almost completely outfoxed. Unfortunately, it seems that as soon as manufacturers of slot machines detect a new cheating method, another more sophisticated one appears. Currently, they are working to eliminate the effectiveness of laser lights on payout sensors.

In the far distant past, slot machines were clunky mechanical gadgets that could easily be tricked or tampered with. From coat hangers and trick coins, casinos and slot machine owners could easily be tricked out of enormous sums of money.

Unfortunately, that is really no different today! To date, the state of Nevada – and home to Las Vegas – has documented over one hundred million dollars in losses at the slots machines, and all to cheaters. Criminal statistics and estimates report a staggering ninety seven percent of slots cheaters getting away with their crimes because they are so difficult to detect.

Why are they so hard to catch? A quick stroll through any busy casino would show hundreds of busy slot machines with often small groups of friends surrounding one or two. With such large numbers of machines, and so many people crowding around them it is virtually impossible to keep a watchful eye on every single machine in a casino. Multiply this by the number of machines in the hundreds of casinos in Nevada alone, and the statistics easily add up.

How do these people cheat? Most often slot machine cheaters require devices or specialized tools to help them get to the money. There are even internet sites that sell cheating devices!

Some of the most well-known include a standard coat hanger which is slid into a mechanical coin counter. The disruption to the equipment causes the coin counter to overpay the player. However, many casinos and manufacturers are eliminating coin counters on the higher value machines, relying instead on club cards and “credit” slips that a player takes to the cashier when they are done.

Another well known device is the “monkey’s paw” created by one of the most famous slots cheaters of all times, Tommy Carmichael. This is a long steel shaft with a claw-like configuration on the end. It is slid up into the coin counter, and working like a coat hanger, causes enough disruption that each payment is significantly higher than it is supposed to be.

There are other much lest sophisticated methods of “tricking” machines, such as fake coins and tokens, or those with a string or wire inserted that can be repeatedly removed from the machine. However many machines are updated with very sophisticated sensors to combat these methods of cheating, and some have inserted special catches that prevent anything from exiting the coin slot.

Currently, as stated earlier, the mini laser lights preferred by millions of business men and women who use them during presentations are now employed in blinding the modernized coin counters. These lights effectively cause the same disruption as the old metal monkey’s paws and coat hangers, triggering the coin counter to overpay the cheating player.